Proximity Home PageCensus 2010 ∓ GeoDemographic Analysis





Census 2010 Main

Related Interactive
Maps & Data



 
  Decision-Making Information
    ProximityOne
  information resources & solutions
  (888) DMI-SOLN
  (888) 364-7656
Census 2010 Apportionment Data

Initial Census 2010 demographic data, the apportionment data, were released December 21, 2010. Based on Census 2010, the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538. The resident population represented an increase of 9.7 percent over the Census 2000 U.S. resident population of 281,421,906. See the U.S. by state ranking table below to view/sort/compare the apportionment data.

The most populous state was California (37,253,956); the least populous, Wyoming (563,626). The state that gained the most numerically since the 2000 Census was Texas (up 4,293,741 to 25,145,561) and the state that gained the most as a percentage of its 2000 Census count was Nevada (up 35.1% to 2,700,551).

The apportionment totals were calculated by a congressionally defined formula, in accordance with Title 2 of the U.S. Code, to divide among the states the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them who could be allocated to a state. Each member of the House represents, on average, about 710,767 people.

Resident Population
The U.S. resident population includes the total number of people in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538 an increase of 9.7 percent over the 281,421,906 counted during the 2000 Census.

Apportionment
Apportionment is the process of dividing the 435 memberships, or seats, in the House of Representatives among the 50 states based on the population figures collected during the decennial census. The number of seats in the House has grown with the country. Congress sets the number in law and increased the number to 435 in 1913. The Constitution set the number of representatives at 65 from 1787 until the first Census of 1790, when it was increased to 105 members. More about apportionment.

Census 2010 Apportionment Data by State -- Interactive Ranking Table
  Click column header to sort; again to sort other direction. Usage notes below table.
  See related demographic-economic ranking tables.
Usage Notes
  • Click on column header to sort on that column; click column header again to sort in other direction.
  • Click Reset button to show all rows and restore view to initial state.
  • See related ranking tables.
Column Headers/Descriptions
  • Population 4/1/00 -- resident population as of April 1, 2000
  • Population 4/1/10 -- resident population as of April 1, 2010
  • Pop Chg 00-10 -- resident population change 4/1/2000 to 4/1/2010
  • %Pop Chg 00-10 -- resident population percent change 4/1/2000 to 4/1/2010
  • Appor Pop 4/1/10 -- apportionment population as of April 1, 2010
      (reflects nonresident population assigned to state by employer, temporarily overseas)
  • Seats 2010 -- Congressional seats by state based on Census 2010
  • Seats +/- -- gain or loss of congressional seats by state based on Census 2010

More About Apportionment
The first decennial census was conducted in 1790 and has been taken every ten years as mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution. Since the first census, conducted by Thomas Jefferson, the decennial count has been the basis for our representative form of government as envisioned by our nation's Founding Fathers. In 1790, each member of the House of Representatives represented about 34,000 residents. Today, the House has more than quadrupled in size, and each member represents about 19 times as many constituents. In 2000, each member of the House of Representatives represented a population of about 647,000.

The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them who could be allocated to a state. The populations of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are excluded from the apportionment population because they do not have voting seats in the U. S. House of Representatives.

The apportionment totals are calculated by a congressionally defined formula in accordance with Title 2 of the U.S. Code.

Additional Information
Proximity develops geodemographic-economic data and analytical tools and helps organizations knit together and use diverse data in a decision-making and analytical framework. We develop custom demographic/economic estimates and projections, develop geographic and geocoded address files, and assist with impact and geospatial analyses. Wide-ranging organizations use our tools (software, data, methodologies) to analyze their own data integrated with other data. Contact Proximity (888-364-7656) with questions about data covered in this section or to discuss custom estimates, projections or analyses for your areas of interest.


Copyright © . Proximity. All Rights Reserved.
Sitemap | Contact Us | News